Take the Dive: Build and Maintain Your Own Swimming Pool

Our friends at Porch.com share tips for building and maintaining your own swimming pool.

Looking for an epic way to spend your summers? Consider adding a swimming pool to your home to create the ultimate staycation, day after day. Nothing says home like sipping a soda poolside as you watch the kids playing a game of Marco Polo or swimming laps for an all-body cardio workout in a refreshing environment. It’s the perfect way to host family get-togethers or parties for your kids’ friends, and we have some advice to help you plan for, build, and maintain a backyard pool.

Along with ensuring fun for kids or a relaxing oasis for adults, building a swimming pool can give a huge boost to the market value of your home. “Does it have a pool?” is a common question that Realtors field from potential home buyers, especially in warmer climates.

Pre-Pool Considerations

Adding a pool to your life (and yard) is an exciting experience. Before you start making pool plans, though, take a good look at your yard. Will a pool enhance your backyard ambiance? Is your yard big enough, and is there adequate access to your backyard for a contractor to dig dirt (and haul it away) and build your pool? Are there trees or a deck in the way that will need to be removed? Do you have existing utility easements, and are wires or pipes running underneath in that location? Will you need to build retaining walls?

These are some of the considerations you’ll need to investigate before you take the leap into pool ownership.

Start Planning Your Pool

As you move from the dreaming to the planning stage, you’ll need to factor in some things, including how much you’ll need to invest in building and maintaining your pool. During the planning process, there’s plenty to do, from deciding what type of pool you want, hiring a contractor, obtaining financing if needed, getting permits, and preparing the location.

Budgeting for a Pool

There are different kinds of pools: above-ground pools and inground pools. The actual cost of your pool will depend on your region and other factors like the size, materials, and features. The average above-ground pool is more economical, and the price also depends on where you live, what materials you use, the size, and other features like an optional deck around the pool.

Factor in Extra Costs

When you’re budgeting, make sure you set aside extra money for electrical work, plumbing, landscaping, fencing and patio improvements. After it’s built, keep extra funds to spend on repairs for your pool pump, lights, and other parts, along with chemicals and professional cleaning.

You may also need to build a fence around your pool. Many cities and counties require a fence for safety reasons.

Before you build a pool, keep in mind that you’ll have monthly fees for pool maintenance and extra electricity to run the pump and other pool components. If you don’t use your pool year-round, don’t forget to factor in the cost of cleaning, preparing for, and safely covering your pool for the winter. These costs will vary depending on the type and size of the pool you build and where you live.

You’ll also want to budget the cost of adding your pool to your existing house insurance policy. Also, ask your agent about liability insurance in case someone is hurt while using your pool.

Where Do you Put Your New Pool?

It’s location, location, location for your new pool. Some people prefer their pool steps away from the back door, while others place their pool a little farther into the yard. The location is up to you, while still considering what’s already in your yard. You’ll want it to blend beautifully with your home and landscape.

Remember, though, that you’ll need to adhere to your local government’s property setbacks for pools and any restrictions if you have a homeowner’s association.

Building your Pool

Now that you’ve decided a pool is in your future, it’s time to rely on your chosen contractor to handle the designing, building, and installation of your pool.

Your contractor will help you decide on the best size, shape, and materials for your pool, whether it’s made from pre-formed fiberglass, or built on-site with vinyl liners or poured concrete. Some homeowners love the convenience and cleaning ease of a smooth fiberglass pool. Fiberglass pools are also a popular choice because they arrive assembled and ready to lower into the hole dug by your contractor’s crew. Or, you may opt for a concrete pool or vinyl liner pool. Above-ground pools are made of steel, aluminum, or resin, with liners. You can also purchase affordable inflatable vinyl above-ground pools that you can set up yourself.

How Long Will it Take?

Swimming pools aren’t built within a weekend. All kinds of variables factor into how long you’ll wait before that first delicious dip into sparkling waters.

Above-ground pools can be installed faster than other types of pools, ready within days. Fiberglass inground pools may take a week or two. Vinyl liner pools may take two weeks to over a month before they’re ready to enjoy. The most expensive pool option, concrete, takes the longest time to complete because construction is more complicated and involves pouring and curing concrete. You may wait months for the project’s completion and your first fun pool party. Other factors, like the weather, can affect the timing of completion.

Pool Decor

While you’re designing your pool, add some color and decorative tiles for a special, relaxing touch. Consider other custom options like underwater lighting, an infinity edge, bench seating or a tanning ledge, ensuring years of personalized enjoyment. Do you plan to swim laps, requiring a longer pool, or prefer weekend relaxing on a water float with a drink in your hand? Consider a shaded lounging area with easy-care pavers, concrete or decking.

While your pool’s under construction, pick out lounge seating, landscaping, and outdoor lighting around your pool or even hide those pipes or structures that are not pleasing to the eye in the backyard. Now’s your chance to turn it into your dream oasis. You might also consider installing some type of privacy fencing or shade material to shield your pool from neighbors’ views.

Taking Care of your Swimming Pool

Once your pool is up and running, you’ll need to maintain it regularly. Familiarize yourself with the parts of your pool and how they work. This will help you troubleshoot if something stops working.

Your pool may be basic, or it may have all the bells and whistles like advanced heating and lights or underwater speakers. Your pool may have an automatic pool cover or maybe an above-ground one that the kids spend their weekends in. Either way, all pools share basic components like (of course) water, a filter system, the interior walls or liner, a pool pump, skimmers and returns to circulate the water.

Keep the walls, bottom and/or lining of your pool clean. Those surfaces are always in contact with pool water and can collect debris, algae and mold if not properly cared for.

To keep your pool sparkling clean, you’ll want to buy supplies including a net skimmer, pool brush, and pool vacuum. Use these to help keep bugs, leaves, and other stuff from making your pool unsightly. Residue from shampoos, sunblock, and perfume can also create cleaning issues for your pool.

At least once a week, use the skimmer, brush and vacuum on your pool. Some pool owners find automatic pool cleaners are a huge time-saver. The cleaner patrols your pool whenever you want, brushing the sides and bottom so you don’t have to.

The pool pump keeps your water circulating so your pool doesn’t become polluted and cloudy. Try to run your filter a minimum of 10 to 12 hours a day or more, 7 days a week, according to recommendations from “A Beginner’s Guide to Pool Maintenance”. You’ll also want to backwash your filter regularly, reversing the flow of water so dirty water and contaminants are carried out of your pool.

Chemistry Class

Keeping your pool water clean and balanced is crucial for safe summer fun, according to the Swim University beginner’s guide. Keep a water testing kit nearby so you can tell right away if your pool chemistry is unbalanced, and what to do to bring the water back to sparkling, safe levels.

Your pool’s pH level is important Lower pH levels are considered acidic, and high levels are basic. You should aim for a pH of 7.4 to 7.6. You’ll also need to check the alkalinity, which is a pH buffer so your pool doesn’t have big spikes. Try to keep this between 100 and 150 parts per million, the beginner’s guide advises.

Keep an eye on the level of your chlorine or bromine sanitizer, too. You may need to add chemicals, including an occasional night-time chemical “shock” after rainstorms or heavy pool use. Following directions and safety precautions ensures pool-chemical maintenance success.

Maintenance Schedule

Set up a pool maintenance schedule and stick to it. The more often you regularly skim, clean, backflush, and check chemicals, the more comfortable you’ll become with the routine. Write up a list with dates of the duties and post somewhere that’s easily seen, like on the refrigerator. You can involve the family with the duties, too.

Some homeowners prefer to spend their pool time relaxing so they pay a pool company to maintain the pool chemicals and cleaning schedule.

Enjoying your Swimming Pool

The reward of owning and maintaining a pool is being able to enjoy it whenever you like and the perfect host for all kinds of get-togethers. Your family will cherish this pool for years, and it’s a great incentive for relatives and friends to visit. A pool is the perfect low-impact way to exercise, too, giving a great cardiovascular workout that’s easy on joints and muscles and ensuring less risk of injury.

You can set up a pool basketball hoop or net for hours of fun. Your kids will invent their own pool games, too, under careful supervision of an adult.

Safety First

While a pool brings years of joy, it also comes with the responsibility of making sure swimmers are safe. Make certain your pool meets all fencing and pool signage requirements, and keep a first aid kit nearby. Now is the perfect time to become certified in CPR. In the United States, you can find courses through the American Red Cross, your local YMCA or a swimming organization near you.

Have an adult who knows how to swim watching when kids are in the pool and keep a locking, alarmed fence around your pool when it’s not in use. Parents of smaller children often feel more secure installing alarms on the doors leading to the pool.

Bring on the Fun

Although the price of building and maintaining a swimming pool can be costly, most homeowners discover that having endless days of laughter and fun under the sun, conveniently right outside their back door, is worth every penny.

This piece was originally posted on Porch.com and has be published with permission.

6 Hot Tub Mistakes to Avoid

Hot tubs can have many benefits – they can help with a post-workout recovery, de-stressing, and even be a place to host parties. If not properly cared for and safe for soaking, hot tub water can pose health risks, like coughs and rashes. Yikes!

The warm water in a hot tub needs special care to remain a safe place for whatever benefits you seek, whether it’s fun, relaxation, or recovery. The certified pHin pool care experts put together a list of 6 Don’ts of hot tub care:

1.       Don’t cut the power on a full tub

Whether you use your hot tub regularly, a few times a month, or a few times a week, it’s necessary to maintain the same water level and a steady temperature. For both cold and warm seasons, this is ideal to maintain the chemical balance vs.  letting your hot tub cool down and then reheating it for each use.

2.       If you see green, don’t get in

If you’re ready for a soak and your hot tub water looks a little off, has a weird foam, green tinge, or flowing foam – don’t get in. These are signs that your hot tub water is unbalanced, unsanitary, or unsafe, and can have health risks. It will need chemical attention to be re-balanced, or you may have to drain and refill the tub to resolve the issue.

3.       Say “no” to plastic covers

Maintaining hot tub water is a delicate balance. A greenhouse setup or a plastic cover can magnify sun rays and trap heat in the tub. This extra heat can make it challenging to maintain a healthy water balance, and can even melt the plastic cover. It’s best to use the hot tub cover recommended by the manufacturer.

4.       Some like it hot – but don’t go over 104° F

The heat of the hot tub can be soothing for tired muscles, or even help with common headache symptoms. But be careful – a hot tub’s max temperature should be 104° F. Heating your hot tub above this level can be unhealthy and dangerous for swimmers, and could also damage your hot tub.

5.       Skip the soaps and suds

Aromatherapy can enhance hot tub relaxation, but it’s best to keep soaps, scents, and suds out of the water. Adding these products is not recommended by most hot tub manufacturers, as they can be detrimental to your system, requiring a drain and refill or  an expensive repair. It’s also a best practice to rinse off in the shower before getting into the hot tub. If you’d like some extra soothing scents, you can try an essential oil diffuser or candles in your hot tub space.

6.       Don’t forget your filters

For best results, hot tub filters need to be cleaned every two to three months and completely replaced every two years. Even if you don’t regularly use the hot tub, changing filters is important, because buildup can be a cause of unbalanced water and affect the lifespan of your hot tub. For a more efficient hot tub, the silver ion cartridge needs to be changed every four months.

Bonus tip #7: Use technology to monitor your hot tub water

Whether you have a service tech who manages your hot tub or you’re taking on the task yourself, the best way to know exactly what’s going on in your hot tub water is to have a smart monitor that analyzes it for you. The pHin has built-in analytics, a mobile app, and Bluetooth connectivity that keeps you informed about your hot tub water and guides you with chemical instructions.

Learn about the three simple steps for pool care with pHin.

pHin Reaches New Milestone: Over One Billion Water Samples Tested!

There are more than 15 million pools and hot tubs in the U.S., and even though water chemistry can be challenging, about 75% of owners test their own water. Maintaining healthy pH, sanitizer, and temperature levels requires water testing at least two to three times a week, which adds up to a lot of hands-on maintenance for pool and spa owners who’d rather be relaxing or splashing around.

pHin, was designed to streamline pool water care so families can just enjoy their pools without all the guesswork. Now part of the Hayward family, pHin has just reached an exciting new milestone: We’ve tested and analyzed over one billion samples of pool and hot tub water!

Because there are so many environmental factors that affect water chemistry such as usage, weather, water temperature, sunlight exposure and more, pool water can easily become unbalanced. pHin helps keep things in check by keeping a constant eye on the chemical levels. There are pHin monitors floating in  pools, hot tubs, and spas around the country, which have collectively taken over one billion samples!

When pHin takes a reading of the sanitizer, pH, or temperature that needs attention, it sends an alert to the user on the mobile app with instructions, so they know exactly what to do to keep the pool or spa water safe and ready for swimming. With a proven track record and years taking measurements pHin is family-tested and industry approved.

pHin is constantly improving to make pool care easier. Having taken over a billion water samples, the monitors provide families with exact instructions to balance their pool water with the chemicals of their choice from a growing database.

Join the families who are letting pHin take the guesswork out of pool care – learn more here: phin.co.

How to Clean Up Your Pool or Hot Tub After Hurricane Season

Weather-related disasters can damage pool and hot tubs with heavy wind and rain. As hurricane season comes to a close along the coast, here are some steps you can take to get your backyard back to a beautiful and safe oasis:

1. Clean up debris and check water levels

Start restoring your pool to its pre-season glory by cleaning debris from the pool water. If your pool doesn’t drain excess water on its own, remove the necessary amount of water to get your pool back to its normal water level. Check that the pump and skimmer aren’t clogged with debris to ensure they’ll work properly. A pool vacuum may be helpful for catching any debris or dirt that has fallen to the bottom of the pool.

2. Restore power to your pool

Flood waters caused by hurricanes may have damaged your pool or hot tub’s electrical equipment. Before restoring power, double check that no equipment is water damaged. If you are unsure, it’s safer to have an electrician double check the area. Once the power is restored, the pool will begin to filter properly again, getting rid of the small debris and particles that were not picked up during the cleaning process.

3. Check water quality

Hurricane flooding and rainfall could have contaminated your pool or spa area, making it unsafe for swimming. Before you re-balance the water, don’t let anybody (including pets!) swim until it’s back to normal chemistry levels. Pools should be at a 7 pH level, which can be affected by the hurricane; it’s also important to check the chlorine, hardness, and cyanuric acid levels in the water. Once you’ve gotten your pool or hot tub back in balance, use the pHin Smart Monitor to easily maintain your water health. pHin monitors your pH, and sanitizer and temperature levels over 1,000 times per week and notifies you when your chemicals need adjusting.

Learn more about pHin here: www.phin.co

The Importance of Collecting a Water Sample to Test

It will almost always be easier to avoid water chemistry issue than it will be to solve it. Eliminating something like an algae bloom once it already colors the water is no simple task. Once the walls are stained and the equipment corroded, the damage is done. Even worse is treating contamination. By the time swimmers or soakers complain about infections and rashes from contaminated pool or hot tub water, it is too late to prevent the spreading of disease. But, using proper sampling techniques and monitoring the chemical content of the water frequently helps you avoid costly, time consuming problems. It is incredibly important for pool operators to be familiar with good water testing kits and techniques.

Use a Sample Container

When conducting a test poolside, many people will just fill the four-in-one test bottles directly. This is perfectly fine provided you thoroughly rinse the bottle prior to collecting samples in order to eliminate any contamination and the pool’s circulation pump is running. Repeat the rinsing process between pH, alkalinity, and chlorine tests.

If you use a pool supply store to test your sample, most typically require eight ounces of water for testing. Some pool stores offer a free sample bottle. If yours doesn’t, make sure that you use a container that both meets the volume requirements and is free of contaminants. Thoroughly clean any repurposed container. Never use an empty chemical bottle, since it may throw off your sample, or pickle jars, since the salt and vinegar will never fully wash out. Also avoid coffee and juice containers as they can affect the pH reading.

Where to Gather Your Sample

Just as important as what you put your water sample in is where you get the water sample from. You don’t want to skim along the top, as that water is not an accurate representation of the entire pool. The recommended level to take your sample is 12 to 18 inches below the surface of the water, or about elbow-deep. Avoid the skimmer, return areas, and anywhere near a floating chlorine feeder to keep from getting an inaccurate chlorine reading. And, if your pool has varying depths, take the water sample from the deep end, which is less affected by temperature.

When to Take Your Sample

Something that many people don’t consider when taking a water sample is timing. Do not take a water sample if you’ve added any chemicals to the pool within the last 12-48 hours. While that may seem like a fairly large time-frame, there are a multitude of factors that may cause a discrepancy, such as the size of the pool and what chemicals you added. Most pool professionals should be able to tell you when to retest your pool’s water based on its specific circumstances. Rain also makes a difference. If it is currently raining, about to rain, or has just finished raining, do not take a water sample. After a rainstorm, wait at least eight hours to take a water sample.

Testing Your Sample

If your tests require using tablet reagents, do not touch the tablets when removing them from their foil packets. If they get wet or the foil packet tears, discard them. When using dip and read test strips, replace the bottle immediately after use; the strips can become reactive with moisture in the air. Pay attention to timing, as colors can change if you wait longer than the specified time. Follow the manufacturer’s directions carefully, since many involve more than one step.

Your samples should be fresh; taking a sample in the morning and coming back to it after going to work or running errands is not ideal. And, if you take a sample and it rains soon after, then that sample is no longer an accurate reflection of the pool.

Ensure that your testing instruments are properly calibrated and do not expose them to high humidity conditions, drop them on the pool decking, or submerge them unless they are fully sealed. It is a good idea to purchase wide range test kits since dilution testing can be a complicated and precise process.

Working with a Pool Store

If this whole process is new to you, be sure to provide basic information to your pool store, such as pool size (in gallons), pool type (fiberglass, concrete, etc.), sanitizer (chlorine, salt system), and anything that has been done to the pool in the last 48 hours.

If you want to avoid all of these hassles and ensure the water in your pool or hot tub stays balanced, consider pHin. It constantly monitors your water and tells your smartphone what you need to do to  keep the water in your pool and hot tub healthy. Use it with your own chemicals for flexibility or get our single-dose, pre-measured chemicals delivered to your door. If you need someone to service your equipment, Pool Service on Demand connects you to local, qualified pool techs.

How to Shock a Swimming Pool

The post How to Shock A Swimming Pool first appeared on Swim University.

You should shock your pool every week or two with the correct amount of shock, but what is shock?

Shock Treatment – The addition of an oxidizing compound or a mixture of oxidizing compounds to the water to destroy chloramines and other undesirable compounds. – Bioguard

When you add chlorine to your pool, the chlorine molecules attach themselves to bacteria and other unwanted material, and it forms a chloramine. Chloramines are essentially dead chlorine. They do nothing and you should get rid of them – this is where shock comes in.

Shock oxidizes the chloramines turning it into a gas. When you smell chlorine, you are smelling chlorine that is NOT in the water because it’s oxidized.

Now that we’ve given you the reason on WHY you should shock your pool, let’s talk about how to shock your pool.

4 Types of Pool Shock

There are 4 different types of pool shock on the market today:

It is important to understand the difference between these 4 types of shock, as they all work differently.

Calcium Hypochlorite

This is the most popular chlorine pool shock. It contains about 65% available chlorine and is cheaper than the rest. When adding to the water, you must first pre-dissolve each pound in a 5 gallon bucket of water to prevent bleaching. This type of shock is slow dissolving, so it will not completely dissolve before it hits the bottom of the your pool. Once added, you will need to wait 8 hours before swimming.

  • 65% chlorine
  • Pre-dissolve required
  • 8 hour wait time
  • Adds calcium to the water
  • Add at night

Lithium Hypochlorite

This type of shock is commonly used in areas that have a high amount of calcium in the water since this shock doesn’t use calcium. It contains about 35% available chlorine and is more expensive than using calcium hypochlorite. The one positive is you don’t have to pre-dissolve this type of shock, but you still need to wait 8 hours before swimming.

  • 35% chlorine
  • No pre-dissolve
  • 8 hour wait time
  • Add at night

Di-Chlor (Grandular Chlorine)

Grandular chlorine is simply 60% chlorine that you can pour directly into the water. You will need to wait 8 hours before swimming again, but no need to pre-dissolve and it contains cyanuric acid (chlorine stabilizer) that protects the chlorine from being burned off by the sun. It’s more expensive than calcium hypochlorite, but you can use it for regular chlorine dosages and shock treatments.

  • 60% chlorine
  • No pre-dissolve
  • 8 hour wait time
  • Adds cyanuric acid to the water
  • Add at night

Potassium Peroxymonosulfate (non-chlorine shock)

Non-chlorine shock is typically used in bromine pools, but you can use it in chlorine pools as well. You do not need to pre-dissolve and it only takes 15 minutes before you can swim again. However, this type of shock can get very expensive.

  • No chlorine
  • No pre-dissolve
  • 15 minute wait time
  • Add anytime

How to Shock a Pool: Quick Tips

  • Always use gloves and protective eye wear.
  • Add 1 pound of shock a 5 gallon bucket of water about 3/4 full.
  • Always add shock to water not water to shock.
  • Wear clothes you don’t care about – they might get bleached.
  • Warm water dissolves shock faster than cold.
  • DO NOT add shock directly to your skimmer!
  • Use a wooden stick and slowly stir in the shock making sure it dissolves completely, or as much as possible.
  • Slowly pour the bucket of pre-dissolved shock around your pool. You may have some undissolved shock at the bottom of your bucket. In this case, just dip your bucket in some pool water give it a slow swish around and pour it back into the pool to help dissolve some of that shock.
  • DO NOT mix all the bags together in one bucket.
  • Always shock at dusk or night time. The chlorine works better when it’s not being burned off by the sun.
  • Shock should also be added every week to ensure a clean and algae-free pool.

Once your pool is restored to order, ensure the water in your pool or hot tub stays balanced, consider a pHin smart monitor. This little device constantly monitors your water and automatically sends you the exact chemicals you need to keep the water in your pool and hot tub healthy.

Can’t Keep Up? Here’s an Easy 4-Step Schedule for Hot Tub Maintenance

You’ll hear us talk lots about consistency when it comes to hot tub maintenance. If a hot tub is going to be enjoyable then you need a simple maintenance schedule that works with your lifestyle.

If you keep your hot tub chemistry close to balanced, you will use less chemicals overall and minimize the workload. Treating problems or replacing hot tub water requires far more product than most people realize.

By keeping it simple and flexible hot tub care becomes easy and automatic. Each brand of hot tub is unique and may need special care. But here is an easy to use maintenance schedule for any hot tub.

  1. Weekly Walk Around

Some are crazy enough to do a weekly walk around daily. It sounds like a lot, but you’re basically accomplishing this task each time you use your hot tub. So if you skip a hot tub soak that week, be sure to head outside for a quick walk around.

  • Ensure the cover is secure and in place.  
  • Check for power to the display unit and ensure the unit is operational. 
  • Have a look at the temperature to ensure it’s close to the set point.
  • Do a quick walk around looking for any damage.  
  1. Weekly Chemistry Check

There are many choices to ensuring your hot tub water is balanced and sanitized:

  • Most hot tub and pool dealers will check any sample of hot tub water that you bring them.  Ensure you grab a sample from the middle of the hot tub as a best practice.  
  • Use the traditional test strips that check for pH, alkalinity and sanitizer level.  Follow the directions on the package and ensure you grab a sample from the middle of the hot tub.  
  • Use the liquid test kits that unfortunately only tests for sanitizer and pH levels.  

pHin Tip –  rid the Weekly Chemistry check with the pHin.  The pHin device continuously monitors water chemistry (pH, sanitizer levels, alkalinity, and hardness) and notifies you of the adjustments required.  It even ships you the correct amounts of chemicals to add.  

  1. Monthly Love For The Tub

This is a great time to give that hot tub cover a quick wipe down. You don’t want grime from the underside dripping into the water. It’s also time to give that filter the love and care it wants. If you are a frequent hot tub user or just had a party, you’ll want to check that filter more often. But this is a great starting point. 

  • Open the filter well and pull out the filter.
  • Ensure the filter(s) are in good shape.
  • Rinse the filter with water and replace. Or if grimy, a 24-hour soak in a chemical cleaner is in order.  

pHin Tip –  it’s wise to have a spare filter. If one needs cleaning then replace it with your spare filter and clean the dirty one when you have time.  

  1. Quarterly Water Replacement

You’ll want to replace the water in your hot tub every three months or so. Again, with frequent use or a party of any sort, you’ll want to replace the water more often.

  • Using a system purge at this stage is a habit that will keep your hot tub plumbing free of build up.  Add a hot tub specific system purge and circulate the system for at least 30 minutes.  
  • Turn off all power to your hot tub.
  • Pull the drain plugs and drain the hot tub completely.
  • This is a great time to scrub that tub down with a 50/50 while vinegar and water solution to get rid of any water lines.  
  • Rinse the hot tub thoroughly and install the drain plugs.
  • Replace the water by sticking the hose in the filter well to avoid air lock in the plumbing. Built-up air in the pipes causes airlock and can damage the pump.  Set a timer on your smartphone so you don’t have to be present for the filling.
  • Power up the hot tub and start that long heating process.
  • Balance and sanitize the new water by adding your start up chemicals (shock and sanitizer), and adjust your pH for the system to work efficiently.  

Consistent maintenance is key for performance and the longevity of your hot tub. Armed with the right tools, a simple schedule and a bit of knowledge that hot tub will remain a joy. Hot tub maintenance is easy with pHin.  It monitors water quality, notifies you by smartphone when you need to add chemicals and ships you just the right amount.   

Be sure to check out the pHin device, a new way to care for your hot tub. pHin monitors water quality, notifies you by smartphone when you need to add chemicals and ships you just the right amounts.